martinsastro

Astronomy for all.
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Dargo to Licola


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1060_1M.jpg
1060_1M.jpgNGC1060.671 viewsThe Hydra Cluster (or Abell 1060) is a cluster of galaxies that contains 157 bright galaxies and can be viewed from earth in the constellation Hydra. [3] The cluster spans about ten million light years and has an unusual high proportion of dark matter. [4] The cluster is part of the Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster located 158 million light years from earth. The cluster's largest galaxies are elliptical galaxies NGC 3309 and NGC 3311 and the spiral galaxy NGC 3312 all having a diameter of about 150,000 light years.[5] In spite of a nearly circular appearance on the sky, there is evidence in the galaxy velocities for a clumpy, three-dimensional distribution.[Martin
Geeks.jpg
Geeks.jpg483 viewsMartin
Omegadone2G.jpg
Omegadone2G.jpgOmega Centaury.577 viewsJust testing the guiding on the G11 with Gemini 2Martin
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dumbbellcrop.jpgDumbbell nebula.527 viewsThe Dumbbell Nebula (also known as Messier 27, M 27, or NGC 6853) is a planetary nebula (PN) in the constellation Vulpecula, at a distance of about 1,360 light years.

This object was the first planetary nebula to be discovered; by Charles Messier in 1764. At its brightness of visual magnitude 7.5 and its diameter of about 8 arcminutes, it is easily visible in binoculars, and a popular observing target in amateur telescopes.
Martin
Guess_who.jpg
Guess_who.jpg488 viewsGuess who?Martin
Cheriocrop.jpg
Cheriocrop.jpgCherio nebula.492 viewsM57 is located in Lyra, south of its brightest star Vega. Vega is the northwestern vertex of the three stars of the Summer Triangle. M57 lies about 40% of the angular distance from β Lyrae to γ Lyrae.[5]

M57 is best seen through at least a 20 cm (8-inch) telescope, but even a 7.5 cm (3-inch) telescope will show the ring.[5] Larger instruments will show a few darker zones on the eastern and western edges of the ring, and some faint nebulosity inside the disk.

This nebula was discovered by Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in January, 1779, who reported that it was "...as large as Jupiter and resembles a planet which is fading." Later the same month, Charles Messier independently found the same nebula while searching for comets. It was then entered into his catalogue as the 57th object. Messier and William Herschel also speculated that the nebula was formed by multiple faint stars that were unable to resolve with his telescope.[6][7]

In 1800, Count Friedrich von Hahn discovered the faint central star in the heart of the nebula. In 1864, William Huggins examined the spectra of multiple nebulae, discovering that some of these objects, including M57, displayed the spectra of bright emission lines characteristic of fluorescing glowing gases. Huggins concluded that most planetary nebulae were not composed of unresolved stars, as had been previously suspected, but were nebulosities.[8][9]
Martin
IMG_0511.jpg
IMG_0511.jpg357 viewsHang this in the ceiling and Mark will be out of business :PMartin
potholomy.jpg
potholomy.jpgNGC6475.583 viewsMessier 7 or M7, also designated NGC 6475 and sometimes known as the Ptolemy Cluster, is an open cluster of stars in the constellation of Scorpius.

The cluster is easily detectable with the naked eye, close to the "stinger" of Scorpius. It has been known since antiquity; it was first recorded by the 1st century astronomer Ptolemy, who described it as a nebula in 130 AD. Giovanni Batista Hodierna observed it before 1654 and counted 30 stars in it. Charles Messier catalogued the cluster in 1764 and subsequently included it in his list of comet-like objects as 'M7'.

Telescopic observations of the cluster reveal about 80 stars within a field of view of 1.3° across. At the cluster's estimated distance of 800-1000 light years this corresponds to an actual diameter of 18-25 light years. The age of the cluster is around 220 million years while the brightest star is of magnitude 5.6.
Martin

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IMG_0518.jpg
IMG_0518.jpgnice view647 viewsnice viewMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0517.jpgARB Kev721 viewsARB Kev.MartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0516.jpg350 viewsKev's CarMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0515.jpg356 viewsJacki and carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0514.jpg360 viewsAlex's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0513.jpg359 viewsScotty's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0512.jpg367 viewsMark beside his carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0511.jpg357 viewsHang this in the ceiling and Mark will be out of business :PMartinMay 21, 2016